Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

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Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

Vol. 54, 01 July 2024


Open Access | Article

Freakalization: Unpacking the Social and Psychological Mechanisms of Marginalization and Othering

Sanad Aburass * 1
1 Maharishi International University

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media, Vol. 54, 205-209
Published 01 July 2024. © 01 July 2024 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Sanad Aburass. Freakalization: Unpacking the Social and Psychological Mechanisms of Marginalization and Othering. LNEP (2024) Vol. 54: 205-209. DOI: 10.54254/2753-7048/54/20241657.

Abstract

This paper introduces the term "Freakalization" to describe the psychological process where individuals distort the image of others in their minds, perceiving them as "freaks" due to perceived differences such as race, ideology, or physical characteristics. Freakalization encapsulates the unjust labeling and marginalization of individuals who deviate from societal norms. The paper examines the mechanisms of freakalization, including media representation, cultural narratives, social interactions, and institutional policies. It also discusses the factors contributing to freakalization, such as race, disability, and ideology. Through historical and contemporary case studies, the paper illustrates the manifestations and consequences of freakalization. By understanding and addressing freakalization, the paper aims to foster a more inclusive and empathetic society.

Keywords

Freakalization, Social Exclusion, Psychological Marginalization

References

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Education Innovation and Philosophical Inquiries
ISBN (Print)
978-1-83558-455-2
ISBN (Online)
978-1-83558-456-9
Published Date
01 July 2024
Series
Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media
ISSN (Print)
2753-7048
ISSN (Online)
2753-7056
DOI
10.54254/2753-7048/54/20241657
Copyright
01 July 2024
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated