Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

- The Open Access Proceedings Series for Conferences


Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

Vol. 43, 14 March 2024


Open Access | Article

The Interplay among Mythology, Culture, and the English Language

Zixuan Fan * 1
1 Beijing National Day School

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Advances in Humanities Research, Vol. 43, 165-171
Published 14 March 2024. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Zixuan Fan. The Interplay among Mythology, Culture, and the English Language. LNEP (2024) Vol. 43: 165-171. DOI: 10.54254/2753-7048/43/20240847.

Abstract

Mythology refers to traditional stories often involving gods and heroes. Many of these tales have been widely popularized, and in turn, have been found to be of high significance in investigating the evolution of the English language and culture. As mythologies are often passed down through cultures, these tales heavily influence modern traditions and beliefs. They also play an important role in the evolution and development of certain languages. This paper discusses the relationship between mythology, language, and culture through the help of a comparative analysis of mythologies, vocabularies, literary works, and traditions regarding death. The analysis reveals that many English words and phrases originate from Greek and Roman mythology, and that an individual's belief is closely connected to the mythology of the culture they grew up in. This, in turn, proves that mythology cannot be ignored when investigating language and culture, and that an understanding of mythological tales will allow individuals to better appreciate both literature and cultural traditions.

Keywords

Mythology, English language, cultural traditions, afterlife beliefs, cross-cultural comparison

References

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Social Psychology and Humanity Studies
ISBN (Print)
978-1-83558-341-8
ISBN (Online)
978-1-83558-342-5
Published Date
14 March 2024
Series
Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media
ISSN (Print)
2753-7048
ISSN (Online)
2753-7056
DOI
10.54254/2753-7048/43/20240847
Copyright
© 2023 The Author(s)
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated