Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

- The Open Access Proceedings Series for Conferences


Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

Vol. 48, 17 May 2024


Open Access | Article

Connection Between Socioeconomic Status and Behavioral Well-being: A Closer Look at Eating and Sleep Disorders

Xinru Li * 1 , Lijing Ouyang 2 , Sizhe Zhang 3 , Li Li 4 , Zitong Huang 5
1 Northeastern University
2 University College London
3 Boston University
4 Auburn University
5 Appleby College

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media, Vol. 48, 1-10
Published 17 May 2024. © 17 May 2024 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Xinru Li, Lijing Ouyang, Sizhe Zhang, Li Li, Zitong Huang. Connection Between Socioeconomic Status and Behavioral Well-being: A Closer Look at Eating and Sleep Disorders. LNEP (2024) Vol. 48: 1-10. DOI: 10.54254/2753-7048/48/20231215.

Abstract

This paper aims to investigate whether there is a correlation between individuals’ socioeconomic status and the prevalence and severity of eating and sleeping disorders. The current study attempts to explain this link from an evolutionary psychology perspective. This study discusses past literature that showed the prevalence and severity of eating and sleeping disorders positively or negatively correlating with factors like mating, social impacts and working, then predicts a positive correlation between a less commonly investigated factor, socioeconomic status, and the prevalence and severity of eating and sleeping disorders. The research proposal suggests that in a correlational study, 1000 participants will complete a questionnaire as a measurement of their socioeconomic status and the prevalence and severity of eating and/or sleeping disorders. A longitudinal study will follow up the data for 12 months. A multiple regression will be conducted. If results are found significant, implications of our findings could be applied both socially and clinically. If a non-significant result is found, the direction of future studies is suggested, including using multiple research methods for further investigation and attempting to establish a causal relationship between the chosen variables.

Keywords

Evolutionary Psychology, Socioeconomic status, Eating Disorder, Sleeping disorder, correlational study

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication Studies
ISBN (Print)
978-1-83558-383-8
ISBN (Online)
978-1-83558-384-5
Published Date
17 May 2024
Series
Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media
ISSN (Print)
2753-7048
ISSN (Online)
2753-7056
DOI
10.54254/2753-7048/48/20231215
Copyright
17 May 2024
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated