Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

- The Open Access Proceedings Series for Conferences


Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

Vol. 31, 07 December 2023


Open Access | Article

Exploring the Direct Effect of Foreign Language Enjoyment on Expectancy-value Motivation and Indirect Effect on English Competence

Xiaoxin Li * 1
1 South China Normal University

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media, Vol. 31, 1-8
Published 07 December 2023. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Xiaoxin Li. Exploring the Direct Effect of Foreign Language Enjoyment on Expectancy-value Motivation and Indirect Effect on English Competence. LNEP (2023) Vol. 31: 1-8. DOI: 10.54254/2753-7048/31/20231404.

Abstract

This study is to examine correlations between foreign language enjoyment (FLE), expectancy-value enjoyment, and English competence of Chinese university students. A questionnaire was used to collect information from 74 Chinese non-English major college students about their FLE, expectancy-value motivation, and their English competence. According to the findings, the mean FLE of Chinese university students is 5.491, showing moderate to high levels of FLE, and the teacher factor is the highest scoring dimension (the mean is 5.982). The teacher appreciation and social environment (the mean is 5.428) are more prominent than the personal enjoyment factor (the mean is 5.065). Besides, in the expectancy-value motivation dimension, achievement value and utility value are most prominent. As far as the relationship between FLE and expectancy-value motivation of Chinese university students is concerned, the results show a significant positive relationship between the two (except for cost value), thus indicating that FLE increases with motivation. Specifically, FLE has the most significant positive relationship with intrinsic value and expectancy beliefs. The Amos path analysis concludes that in the FLE dimension, personal enjoyment factors can indirectly affect students' English competence in addition to directly positively correlating with expectancy-value motivation, which highlights the important influence of personal factors on foreign language learning.

Keywords

foreign language enjoyment, expectancy-value motivation, English competence, Chinese undergraduates

References

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Interdisciplinary Humanities and Communication Studies
ISBN (Print)
978-1-83558-177-3
ISBN (Online)
978-1-83558-178-0
Published Date
07 December 2023
Series
Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media
ISSN (Print)
2753-7048
ISSN (Online)
2753-7056
DOI
10.54254/2753-7048/31/20231404
Copyright
07 December 2023
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated