Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

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Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

Vol. 43, 14 March 2024


Open Access | Article

Impact of Family Factor on Individual’s Reading Habit in China

Xi Chen * 1
1 University of Santa Barbara

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Advances in Humanities Research, Vol. 43, 181-188
Published 14 March 2024. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Xi Chen. Impact of Family Factor on Individual’s Reading Habit in China. LNEP (2024) Vol. 43: 181-188. DOI: 10.54254/2753-7048/43/20240656.

Abstract

Though it is nearly a common recognition that reading is beneficial to an individual’s internal growth, the size of reading population seems to shrink so fast in modern society: people always use their lack of leisure time as well as the busyness of working and studying as their excuses. However, reading is not only a hobby, but also a long-term habit that may company an individual for the whole lifetime. We form all kind of habit since childhood time, does family attribute to our reading habits? This paper summarizes some previous literatures which investigates the influence of family factors on individuals’ reading habit, but surprisingly notices that some of the findings do not align with today’s phenomenon in China. To find out how the family factors such as family income and parents’ attitudes toward reading influence one’s reading habit, this paper conduct research using self-report questionnaire, analyzes some of the potential factors that may contribute more to today’s changing reading trend, while debunking some findings that do not fit today’s situation.

Keywords

Literature, Socioeconomic, Family, Reading Habits

References

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Social Psychology and Humanity Studies
ISBN (Print)
978-1-83558-341-8
ISBN (Online)
978-1-83558-342-5
Published Date
14 March 2024
Series
Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media
ISSN (Print)
2753-7048
ISSN (Online)
2753-7056
DOI
10.54254/2753-7048/43/20240656
Copyright
© 2023 The Author(s)
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated