Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

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Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media

Vol. 2, 01 March 2023


Open Access | Article

Comparative Study of Fascism and Ultra-Nationalism: Concept and Case

Bingxu Yao 1 , Junbo Tao 2 , Ziyang Wang * 3
1 Department of Political Economy, King's College London, London, SE59NU, UK
2 Department of Government, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, WC2A2AE, UK
3 School of International and Public Affairs, Jilin University, Changchun, 130015, China

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Advances in Humanities Research, Vol. 2, 34-47
Published 01 March 2023. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Bingxu Yao, Junbo Tao, Ziyang Wang. Comparative Study of Fascism and Ultra-Nationalism: Concept and Case. LNEP (2023) Vol. 2: 34-47. DOI: 10.54254/2753-7048/2/2022321.

Abstract

Fascism and ultra-nationalism are closely related, and while fascism absorbs ultra-nationalism, it is also different from it. Leaders played an important role in the transition from ultra-nationalism to fascism and the construction of fascism. The police order is a characteristic of fascism and a bridge between ultra-nationalism and fascism. By comparing the specific cases of German Nazis and Israel under the Religious Zionist Party and New Right, the key difference between fascism and ultra-nationalism is reflected in many aspects. This work will provide a new interpretation path for the integration and comparison of fascism and ultra-nationalism. As well as reference and inspiration for future research on the influence of leaders, ideologies and systems on the historical path of regime change and hierarchical order.

Keywords

Ultra-nationalism, Fascism, Police order., Leadership

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Educational Innovation and Philosophical Inquiries (ICEIPI 2022), Part I
ISBN (Print)
978-1-915371-07-2
ISBN (Online)
978-1-915371-08-9
Published Date
01 March 2023
Series
Lecture Notes in Education Psychology and Public Media
ISSN (Print)
2753-7048
ISSN (Online)
2753-7056
DOI
10.54254/2753-7048/2/2022321
Copyright
© 2023 The Author(s)
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated